You are here
Home > SEC >

UGA Football Releases Two New Uniforms for the 2020 Season

On Thursday morning, Georgia Football released two new alternate uniforms for the upcoming 2020 football season that kicks off on September 26th at Arkansas. The uniforms immediately made a splash on social media and message boards as UGA released both a throwback white jersey paired with red pants and an alternate black jersey that is paired with the traditional silver britches.

The white throwback uniform is an exact replica of the same uniform that went down into Georgia lore on September 6, 1980 in Knoxville, Tennessee. It was in these white jerseys and red pants where Herschel Walker introduced himself to Bill Bates, the Georgia Bulldog nation, and to the world. Georgia will wear these to commemorate the 40th anniversary of both that game and the 1980 National Championship team.

The throwback white jersey is noticeably different than Georgia’s normal white jersey, as the throwback prominently features block numbers with no outline compared to the rounded custom numbers with a red outline in our modern white jerseys, and shoulder numbers that sit higher up than the shoulder numbers on our current uniforms. Also, the throwback replicates the shoulder stripe design that was worn during the 1980 season, with a thick red stripe surrounded by two black stripes and features a 40th anniversary patch for the 1980 National Champions. The red pants feature an identical stripe pattern from the 1980 red pants worn in Knoxville, with a thick white stripe surrounded by thin black outlines. The red pants were a routine away game uniform before Vince Dooley reintroduced silver britches in 1980, in the week following the Tennessee game, at home against Texas A&M on September 13. The last time Georgia wore red pants was in 1988 at South Carolina, and until now, the red pants have remained a relic of the Vince Dooley era.

The second uniform released today was a new black jersey. Georgia already has a black jersey in its current uniform lineup, so why did Georgia introduce a new black jersey? And why the dog collar and alternate Bulldog logos? If you look closely on the alternate Bulldog logo on the shoulders, the number 100 replaces the G that is found on the 2013 Nike-designed alternate logo. Why the number 100? 2020 is actually the 100th anniversary of when Georgia’s football team was coined the Bulldogs. This black alternate jersey seeks to honor the 100 years that Georgia has been represented by the nickname and mascot. This excerpt from GeorgiaDogs.com explains further:

Many old-timers say Georgia acquired the nickname, Bulldogs, because of the strong ties with Yale whose nickname is Bulldogs. Georgia’s first president, Abraham Baldwin, was a Yale man and the early buildings on campus were designed from blueprints of the same building at Yale. But on Nov. 3, 1920, Morgan Blake of the ATLANTA JOURNAL wrote about school nicknames and said “The Georgia Bulldogs” would sound good because there is a certain dignity about a bulldog, as well as ferocity.” After a 0-0 tie with Virginia in Charlottesville on Nov. 6, 1920, ATLANTA CONSTITUTION writer Cliff Wheatley used the name “Bulldogs” in his story five times. The name has been used ever since.

“Georgia Traditions,” georgiadogs.com, Retrieved September 17, 2020, https://georgiadogs.com/sports/2017/6/16/traditions.aspx

Besides the aforementioned alternate logos on the shoulder, the black jersey also features white block numbers with no outline, compared to the current rounded numbers with red outlines found in the black jerseys last worn in 2016 against Louisiana-Lafayette and seen in recruiting photos. In a change for recent UGA uniforms, there are no shoulder numbers, as the alternate Bulldog logo takes it place. The uniforms also feature a red Dawg collar, modeled on both the alternate logo and Hairy Dawg’s costume. Although the Dawg collar and alternate logos have received the most mixed reaction, I think it’s a unique and creative way to honor the 100th anniversary of the Bulldogs nickname. Mascot-themed uniforms aren’t a new phenomenon, as Florida wore “Gator skin” uniforms in 2017, Georgia Tech has worn honeycomb uniforms in the 2010’s, Florida State has worn special uniforms with increased Seminole imagery, and Oregon even added orange to their green and yellow color scheme to look like actual Ducks in 2016, just to name a few.

Both uniforms also feature a “Together and Equality” patch that will most likely be seen on the normal red and white uniforms, and both uniforms also are a part of Nike’s “Vapor Untouchable” template, a design that UGA has worn since the 2017 season.

The new uniforms have been a welcome site to Georgia fans, as many fans have been clamoring for an alternate look once or twice a year since the Dawgs last donned the black jerseys in 2016. Of the fans’ sentiments, it seems like black jerseys and red pants have been the two most wanted alternates, so it sounds like UGA and Nike heard the fans when collaborating to honor these anniversaries. Paul Lukas of Uni-Watch confirmed that the normal red and white uniforms will be worn as well this season.

Although the uniforms have been released, the dates that Georgia will wear them have not been released yet. Based on reports from AJC, the Dawgs will wear the white throwbacks against Arkansas in the season opener. The report had no date set for when Georgia will wear black uniforms, but many are speculating the black jerseys will be worn against Auburn like in 2007, or could be a special homecoming uniform, currently scheduled against Miss State. UGA Football Equipment’s Twitter account @UGAFBEquipment normally have posted locker room shots of uniforms the morning of the game in past seasons, so it sounds like we will have our answer at the latest the morning of each game.

We at ATL Sports Wire want to hear your thoughts on the uniforms! Let us know what you think! Also, we want to hear what game you think Georgia will wear the black jerseys! Let us know in the comments!

The South's Got Something To Say!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Top